News from Sidney

  • The Wilson SocietySidney student societies
    Monday, 7th February 2011

    The Wilson Society, the College's society for Natural Scientists, met last week for their annual dinner. Their pre-dinner speaker was Emeritus Professor of Zoology and former Master of Sidney Professor Sir Gabriel Horn. (Full story)

  • College Hall100 Toms raise tons for Tommy's
    Saturday, 5th February 2011

    A charity dinner has raised over £1,000 for the baby charity Tommy's. (Full story)

  • Profile - Professor Dame Ann Dowling. Photograph by Philip MynottFrom Concorde to Covent Garden
    Friday, 4th February 2011

    From a dusty runway in Kent to the Royal Opera House, Head of the Department of Engineering Professor Dame Ann Dowling finds echoes of engineering in some unexpected places. At first sight there is little obvious connection between opera – which, along with walking, Debrett’s lists under Professor Dame Ann Dowling’s recreations – and Concorde. That’s because the connection, at least for Dowling, lies not in sight but in sound. Acoustics, especially aircraft noise, is one of Professor Dowling’s longest standing academic interests, an interest she traces to a holiday job at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough during her undergraduate degree in Applied Mathematics. According to Dowling: “Farnborough was where I became interested in aircraft noise, and it influenced my decision about what to focus on during my PhD.” Her PhD was related to Concorde and the noise of its turbo jet engines during high-speed flight. As she was finishing her PhD, Professor Dowling had the opportunity to cross the Atlantic on Concorde. “It was a great thrill,” she remembers, but not her most memorable Concorde experience. That came several years later when, having gained her private pilot’s licence, she and her husband Dr Tom Hynes – a fellow researcher in the Engineering Department at Cambridge – were preparing to land their plane at Manston Airport, Kent. “Concorde was arriving back after a pleasure flight and we had to hold at about 1,000 feet above the end of the runway while it landed underneath us. As it came in, we could see in the dust that it skimmed up the special vortices formed over Concorde’s delta-shaped wings that it uses to get its lift. It was beautiful, one of those perfect moments, with Concorde beneath us and the sea on one side,” she says. (Full story)

  • Cloister CourtTribute to John Herivel
    Friday, 28th January 2011

    Peter Lipscomb pays to tribute to John Herivel, WWII code-breaker and Sidney alumnus, who has died at the age of 92. (Full story)

  • Phillip Crouch, Stephen Mather and Brian GirdlestoneChefs celebrate success
    Thursday, 27th January 2011

    Sidney chefs are celebrating after becoming Salon Culinaire Medal Winners at the Hospitality 2011 show, held at the NEC in Birmingham. (Full story)

  • The new instrumentNew harpsichord for Sidney
    Thursday, 27th January 2011

    The College has recently taken delivery of a magnificent new harpsichord, which must rate as one of the finest instruments in Cambridge. (Full story)

  • Salzburg (photograph C. Sumnall)Derek Beales discusses Mozart with BBC
    Saturday, 15th January 2011

    As part of BBC Radio 3's celebration of Mozart, Derek Beales discusses various influences on the composer's life and work. (Full story)

  • A Didier guitar, made in France c.1815. Photograph courtesy of Christopher Page. Click to enlarge.First Cambridge Seminar on the Romantic Guitar
    Thursday, 13th January 2011

    The First Cambridge Seminar on the Romantic Guitar, 1780-1840, will take place in Sidney Sussex between Monday 4 and Wednesday 6 April, 2011. (Full story)

  • Cloister CourtChristopher Stoneman
    Sunday, 9th January 2011

    The College is saddened to report that Fellow Commoner Professor Christopher Stoneman has died. (Full story)

  • The marvel of modern flightSidney graduate is a guest on Royal Institution Christmas Lectures
    Sunday, 19th December 2010

    Sidney graduate student John Aveson is a guest at the second of this year's Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, 'Why Chocolate Melts and Jet Engines Don't'. (Full story)