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Medicine at Sidney

Medicine at Cambridge

The Cambridge undergraduate course is renowned for its rigorous exposition of foundational knowledge in preclinical sciences. In the first two years, the Departmental lecture courses, practicals and dissection classes are supported by College supervisions, usually in groups of 2-3 students and led by clinician-scientists, veterinarians, or biomedical scientists with relevant research expertise. The lecture-based course is complemented throughout the three years of the preclinical degree by structured exposures to selected clinical environments through the “Preparing for Patients” programme, with support by College supervisors available where appropriate. Direction of Studies for medical students alternates between biomedical scientists and clinicians,  who cooperate closely throughout. Medical students complete requirements for the M.B. degree by the end of the second year.  The preclinical subjects are:

Year 1 (Part IA)

Functional Architecture of the Body (Anatomy), supervised by Mr Sid Lawrence, an orthopaedic surgical trainee and one of Sidney’s medical Directors of Studies.

Homeostasis (Physiology), supervised by Dr Colin Roberts, Sidney's Director of Studies in Veterinary Medicine

Molecules in Medical Science (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), supervised by Dr Tony Jackson, a biochemist and one of Sidney's medical Directors of Studies

Introduction to the Scientific Basis of Medicine (Epidemiology and Medical Statistics)

Social Context of Health and Illness (Medical Sociology)

Year 2 (Part IB)

Mechanisms of Drug Action (Pharmacology and Toxicology), supervised by Dr Paul Flynn, a consultant in metabolic medicine and one of Sidney's medical Directors of Studies

Biology of Disease (Pathology), supervised by Dr Frances Hall, a consultant rheumatologist

Neurobiology and Human Behaviour with neuroanatomy, Supervised by Dr Daniel Fountain

Human Reproduction, supervised by Dr Robert Abayasekara, a biomedical scientist and Director of Studies for Medicine at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge

Head and Neck anatomy, supervised by Mr Sid Lawrence

Year 3 (Part II)

In the third undergraduate year, most students elect to study one of the biomedical sciences in greater depth, leading to a B.A. degree. This is analogous to the integrated BSc course offered at some other   universities.

Supervisions are arranged at the students’ initiative through the appropriate Department, with support from the College Director of Studies and further College involvement where necessary and appropriate. Students also explore a specialist topic of their choice in depth, either by preparing a review of the literature on a contentious subject or by performing cutting-edge laboratory-based research. In either setting, one-on-one supervision is provided through the Department or laboratory hosting the work.

A minority of Part II students opt to pursue studies outside of the biomedical sciences, and may do so in any course of study that will admit them in Part II. In recent years, students have chosen to study courses such as Modern Languages and Theology.

Years 4-6

Since 2016 all undergraduate students who are successful in the 2nd MB are offered a place on the clinical course at Cambridge.

Although the role of the College becomes less prominent in the clinical years, a clinical Director of Studies, Dr Mark Gurnell, is available to provide College-based support to students. Students continue to participate in Sidney's biomedical activities and in its Medical and Veterinary Society. A few top students are chosen to contribute to College supervisions of undergraduates. Sidney medics have generally done very well in their clinical studies, ranking highly in their overall evaluations and being awarded prizes for their performance. They go on to pursue successful careers in biomedicine, mostly based in the NHS.

The Cambridge undergraduate course is renowned for its rigorous exposition of foundational knowledge in preclinical sciences. In the first two years, the Departmental lecture courses, practicals and dissection classes are supported by College supervisions, usually in groups of 2-3 students and led by clinician-scientists, veterinarians, or biomedical scientists with relevant research expertise. The lecture-based course is complemented throughout the three years of the preclinical degree by structured exposures to selected clinical environments through the “Preparing for Patients” programme, with support by College supervisors available where appropriate. Direction of Studies for medical students alternates between biomedical scientists and clinicians,  who cooperate closely throughout. Medical students complete requirements for the M.B. degree by the end of the second year.  The preclinical subjects are:

Year 1 (Part IA)

Functional Architecture of the Body (Anatomy), supervised by Mr Sid Lawrence, an orthopaedic surgical trainee and one of Sidney’s medical Directors of Studies.

Homeostasis (Physiology), supervised by Dr Colin Roberts, Sidney's Director of Studies in Veterinary Medicine

Molecules in Medical Science (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), supervised by Dr Tony Jackson, a biochemist and one of Sidney's medical Directors of Studies

Introduction to the Scientific Basis of Medicine (Epidemiology and Medical Statistics)

Social Context of Health and Illness (Medical Sociology)

Year 2 (Part IB)

Mechanisms of Drug Action (Pharmacology and Toxicology), supervised by Dr Paul Flynn, a consultant in metabolic medicine and one of Sidney's medical Directors of Studies

Biology of Disease (Pathology), supervised by Dr Frances Hall, a consultant rheumatologist

Neurobiology and Human Behaviour with neuroanatomy, Supervised by Dr Daniel Fountain

Human Reproduction, supervised by Dr Robert Abayasekara, a biomedical scientist and Director of Studies for Medicine at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge

Head and Neck anatomy, supervised by Mr Sid Lawrence

Year 3 (Part II)

In the third undergraduate year, most students elect to study one of the biomedical sciences in greater depth, leading to a B.A. degree. This is analogous to the integrated BSc course offered at some other   universities.

Supervisions are arranged at the students’ initiative through the appropriate Department, with support from the College Director of Studies and further College involvement where necessary and appropriate. Students also explore a specialist topic of their choice in depth, either by preparing a review of the literature on a contentious subject or by performing cutting-edge laboratory-based research. In either setting, one-on-one supervision is provided through the Department or laboratory hosting the work.

A minority of Part II students opt to pursue studies outside of the biomedical sciences, and may do so in any course of study that will admit them in Part II. In recent years, students have chosen to study courses such as Modern Languages and Theology.

Years 4-6

Since 2016 all undergraduate students who are successful in the 2nd MB are offered a place on the clinical course at Cambridge.

Although the role of the College becomes less prominent in the clinical years, a clinical Director of Studies, Dr Mark Gurnell, is available to provide College-based support to students. Students continue to participate in Sidney's biomedical activities and in its Medical and Veterinary Society. A few top students are chosen to contribute to College supervisions of undergraduates. Sidney medics have generally done very well in their clinical studies, ranking highly in their overall evaluations and being awarded prizes for their performance. They go on to pursue successful careers in biomedicine, mostly based in the NHS.



Medicine at Sidney

At Sidney, we pride ourselves on providing close, personal support for students to guide them through the rigorous academic study required at Cambridge. Our aim is to support the academic training and personal growth of students with the potential to become excellent clinicians and scientists.

Supervision at Sidney is provided by academics who are dedicated to teaching. We aim to tailor our teaching programme to the needs of the students and always welcome their feedback and suggestions in doing so. Our staff are proud to have won several University teaching awards over the last few years.

Away from the classrooms and lecture theatres, the Sidney Sussex Medical and Veterinary Society provides a supportive social environment and opportunities for networking and academic enrichment.


Academics

Director of Studies (DoS) 

Dr Paul Flynn (Fellow)

Dr Mark Gurnell (Clinical) (Fellow)

Dr Anthony Jackson (Fellow)

Dr Sid Lawrence (College Teaching Associate)

Fellows

Professor Timothy Cox

Dr Frances Hall

Dr Colin Roberts

All of our undergraduate students are allocated a Director of Studies and learn from specialists in particular areas of their subject. From time to time, individual teaching staff may be away on leave.


Typical Intake

9

Standard Entry Requirements

A*A*A at A Level, or 40-42 points in the IB, with 776 at Higher Level (please see the University website for standard entry requirements in other qualifications). Please note that offers are set on an individual basis using all of the information available to us in context of the entire field of applicants.

All Colleges require A Level/IB Higher Level Chemistry, and one of Biology/Human Biology, Physics and Mathematics. At Sidney, applicants not taking A Level or IB Higher Level Biology may be asked to undertake additional reading prior to commencing their studies. Most applicants to Cambridge are taking three sciences / mathematics subjects at A Level, and the most common combination is Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics.

Work experience

We seek to admit students with an outstanding record in relevant biomedical science subjects, who will be able to take a scientifically sound, critical approach to the practice of medicine, and who may have the potential to become successful clinician-scientists. At the same time, we seek applicants who exhibit the human qualities of excellent clinicians, such as compassion, empathy, integrity and drive. Accordingly, the admissions process evaluates the applicants’ academic background and scientific aptitude, as well as evidence of exposure to relevant medical environments through volunteering or shadowing experiences.

Admissions Process

Written work

We will not ask you to submit any written work as part of your application.

Admissions Assessments

Bio-Medical Admissions Test (BMAT). Read more about the admissions assessment on the University website..

Interviews

Two interviews; both will have a focus on Medicine and involve working through some practical problems.

Find out more

Department of Medicine

School of Clinical Medicine

Faculty of Biology

University website Medicine course page

Preparing for the BMAT