College Fellows and Staff

Dr Craigwood

Dr Joanna Craigwood

Fellow in English

Graduate Tutor

Director of Studies in English

College Room: JL19

College Tel: +44 1223 3 38839


Web: Department, Research Network

Personal Biography

Joanna Craigwood is a Fellow in English and Graduate Tutor at Sidney. She is also Director of Studies in English for the College in 2016-17. She teaches early modern English literature including Shakespeare and has served as an Affiliated Lecturer at the Faculty of English.

Jo's current research explores the interface between early modern literary and diplomatic forms of representation, with a particular focus on the writings of Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Shakespeare and John Donne, as well as early modern diplomatic treatises and related historical documents. She also works on diplomatic agency in the international circulation of books, manuscripts, and literary news in early modern Europe. Jo studied for her BA, MPhil and PhD in English literature at St John’s College, Cambridge.

Jo is co-investigator on the AHRC-funded international research network Textual Ambassadors: Cultures of Diplomacy and Literary Writing in the Early Modern World. From 2011 to 2016 she edited the Bulletin of the UK Society for Renaissance Studies.

Selected Publications

'Diplomatic Metonymy and Antithesis in 3 Henry VI', Review of English Studies (2014) 65  (272): 812-830. doi: 10.1093/res/hgu043. View.

‘Shakespeare’s Kingmaking Ambassadors’, in Jason Powell and William T. Rossiter (eds), Diplomacy and Authority from Dante to Shakespeare (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013), pp. 199-217. ISBN 978-1-4094-3020-9.

 ‘Sidney, Gentili, and the Poetics of Embassy’, in Robyn Adams and Rosanna Cox (eds), Diplomacy and Early Modern Culture (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), pp. 82-100. ISBN 978-0-23-023976-0.

‘Diplomats and International Book Exchange’, in Ann Thomson, Simon Burrows and Edmond Dziembowski (eds), Cultural Transfers: France and Britain in the Long Eighteenth Century, SVEC 2010:4 (Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2010), pp. 57-69. ISBN 978-0-72-940993-3.